3/29/2013

By BILAL BBA   Posted at  3/29/2013   No comments






The Search For Happiness
 
Regardless of what you want, a new car, a black belt, a boyfriend etc, ultimately, the thing we all crave is to be happy. Despite this, many fail to grab hold of this free commodity. This article offers three suggestions for how you can find happiness in your life.
 
 













Four Keys To Finding Happiness
This short article offers four easy-to-follow philosophies for find happiness in your life.
 
Reaching Out, Reaching In
Most people are aware there is some sort of mind body connection but few realise just how much it impacts our lives. We live in a World where literally thousands of people die each day due to stress related illnesses and one in five adults live with psychosomatic illnesses. So why are people so many people unhappy and therefore unhealthy?
 
 The Definition Of Frustration
Frustration rears its ugly head in nearly every area of our life. We may become frustrated at work because we are not recognised, in our studies because our results are not improving, in our fitness programs because the weight doesn’t seem to fall off, in our relationships because we continue to argue. This article gives insight into how to give frustration the slip and move forward in your life.
 
 
 
All I want Is To Be Happy
With the complexities of the human condition, when you break it all down, we all share one basic desire in life; we want to be happy. If this is the case, and we put so much effort into achieving it, why is it so hard to find? This article looks at the human emotion of happiness and how to best obtain it.
 
 
 
 
 

3/15/2013

Jackie Chan the man

By BILAL BBA   Posted at  3/15/2013   No comments

Genuine Karate is like hot water; it cools down if you do not keep heating it.

                             
 
     




Jackie Chan, SBS, MBE (born Chan Kong-sang, ; 7 April 1954) is a Hong Kong actor, action choreographer, comedian, director, producer, martial artist, screenwriter, entrepreneur, singer, and stunt performer. In his movies, he is known for his acrobatic fighting style, comic timing, use of improvised weapons, and innovative stunts. He is one of the few actors to have performed all of his film stunts. Jackie Chan has been acting since the 1960s and has appeared in over 150 films.
Chan has received stars on the Hong Kong Avenue of Stars and the Hollywood Walk of Fame. As a cultural icon, Chan has been referenced in various pop songs, cartoons, and video games. An operatically trained vocalist, Chan is also a Cantopop and Mandopop star, having released a number of albums and sung many of the theme songs for the films in which he has starred.

The Jackie Chan Charitable Foundation

Founded in 1988, the Jackie Chan Charitable Foundation offers scholarships and active help to Hong Kong's young people through a variety of worthy causes. Over the years, the foundation has broadened its scope to include provision of medical services, aid to victims of natural disaster or illness, and projects where the major beneficiaries are Hong Kong people or organisations. Major donation projects of The Jackie Chan Charitable Foundation:
  • The Jackie Chan Gymnasium at Lingnan University
  • The Jackie Chan Challenge Cup Intercollegiate Invitation Tournament
  • The Jackie Chan Family Unit, Hong Kong Girl Guides Association Jockey Club Beas River Lodge
  • The Jackie Chan Whole Person Development Center
  • Renovation of the Bethanie Site, Hong Kong Academy for Performing Arts
  • Medical Funding in mainland China (Operation Smile)[139]
  • Medical Donation in Hong Kong (Queen Mary Hospital, SARS Relief)
  • Support for the Performing Arts
  • Youth Development Programs

The Dragon's Heart Foundation

The Dragon's Heart Foundation was founded in 2005 to fulfill the desperate needs of children and the elderly in remote areas of China. Since 2005, the Dragon's Heart Foundation has built over a dozen schools, provided books, fees, and uniforms, and has raised millions of dollars to give much-needed educational opportunities for the poor. In addition, the Dragon's Heart Foundation provides for the elderly with donations of warm clothing, wheelchairs, and other items. Jackie often travels to the remote locations to attend groundbreakings or school openings, and to lend support and encouragement.


3/14/2013

The Principles of Karate

By BILAL BBA   Posted at  3/14/2013   No comments
    
By Anko Itosu




Karate did not originate from the way of Buddhism or from the way of Confucianism. In the not-too-distant past, both Shorin-ryu and Shorei-ryu were introduced from China. Both styles have many similarities and they both have their strong points. They should not be changed. I would like to make a record of the following things: 

1. The main purpose of Karate is for health benefits. It is appropriate to fight an antagonist if your purpose is to safeguard your country or those who preside over you. When you fight, you should have no hesitation to lose your own life if necessary (the resolute acceptance of death). Never fight an enemy without good reason. If you encounter a criminal or a ruffian, don’t fight him if you can help it, but just block as you evade, stepping out of the way. 

2. The purpose of Karate is to make the body like iron, or as hard as rock. Your hands and feet should be used like the points of arrows. Your heart should be mighty and bold. If children would practice Karate from the time they are in elementary school, they would be well prepared for the time they are to serve in the Armed Forces. After the Duke of Wellington defeated Napoleon, he mentioned the fact that that tomorrow's triumph will come from today's school yard. 

3. Karate cannot be learned in a short amount of time. A bull that walks very slowly will, in due time, travel a thousand miles. In like manner, if you study and practice earnestly each day, in three or four years you will understand what the core of Karate is about. Indeed, the very shape of your bones will change. 
You will discover the essence of Karate if you follow these points:

4. In Karate, the "fist-foot" or fist and foot is a very important point. You should train them thoroughly on the makiwara. When you do it, drop your shoulders, open your lungs, take hold of your strength, grip the floor with your feet and sink your ch'i to your lower abdomen. Excercise with each arm one to two hundred times. 

5. When you are practicing Karate stances, make sure your back is straight, drop your shoulders, take your strength and put it in your legs, stand firmly and direct the ch'i into your lower abdomen. You must hold the top and bottom of your abdomen together tightly. 

6. You should practice the external techniques of Karate one by one, repeated over and over again, many times. These things are passed down verbally. Therefore, it is very important to spend the time and effort to learn the explanations and decide when and how they should be used. Go in, counter, release; is the rule of torite.

7. You must decide for yourself why you practice Karate, whether it is for making your body more healthy or for improving yourself in doing your duties.

8. During practice you should imagine that you are in a real battle. When blocking and striking make your eyes glare, drop your shoulders and harden your body. Then block the incoming punch and then strike him. Always practice with this spirit so that when you are in a real battle, you will be well prepared to be able to react naturally.

9. Do not overexert yourself during practice, because your ch'i will rise up, your face and eyes will turn red and you will bring injury to your body. Be careful of this.

10. In the past, many of those who have become experts in Karate have lived to an old age. This is because Karate helps to develop the bones and sinews. It also helps the digestive tract and is good for blood circulation. Therefore, from this time foreward, Karate should be the foundation of all lessons in sports from the elementary schools on up. If this is the way it is done from now on, I think that there will be many people who, when they are alone and outnumbered, will literally be able to win against ten attackers.

The reason for writing all this is that, in my opinion, all students at the Okinawa Prefectural Teachers' Training College should practice Karate, so that when they graduate, they will be able to teach the school children the same way I have taught them. I predict that within ten years Karate will spread all over Okinawa and then to the Japanese mainland. This will be a great asset to the military and to our society. I expect that you will carefully study the words I have written here.
Anko Itosu, October 1908





3/10/2013

Mental Power Training for Karate: Controlling Your Self-Image

By BILAL BBA   Posted at  3/10/2013   1 comment



  Self-defense is not a sport.

 

I think we can all agree on that.
So, by definition, traditional Karate can’t really be called a sport. Sure, people try hard to make Karate into a pseudo team sport – especially in tournaments – but the harsh reality is that on the mythical ‘streets’ there is just one person you can count on, and that person is you. No backup, no judges, no weight-classes, no safety net. Just you and your bare fists.

However, just like in sports, traditional Karate involves two opposite sides.
A losing side and a winning side.

Which side do you want to be on?
Me, personally, I prefer the winning side. You know, the side that can go home without the crutches. And who doesn’t? I mean, even in school, from a young age, we’re all taught that we should always strive to be winners. Winners get all the praise, attention and honor. Nobody ever comes up to a loser and says “That was great, you’re super!” unless they’re being sarcastic. Right?
Sadly, when it comes to sport, not everybody can always be a winner. If you are smaller, weaker or slower than your competition, chances are slim that you’ll ever win in any significant way (unless you have insane amounts of motivation). You just don’t have the odds on your side. So you change, and either choose a team sport (where you can blend in) or you quit sports altogether and play video games instead.
But, again, traditional Karate isn’t a sport.
Because the streets don’t allow for that.
In self-defense there is no quitting, no changing, and we must always assume that our competition will be bigger, stronger, faster, meaner and harder. Every time.
And, to top it off, we must win.
Every time.
Being average, blending in, is easy and safe in the dojo – but when things are about to go down you need to step your game up and give 110%.
And, if you ask me, one of the most surefire ways to succeed with that is by having the correct mental attitude. So that’s what this article is going to be about. Mental training. Sports psychology. To help you understand a bit more about the non-physical aspect of training… in order to stop being the ‘best of the worst’ or the ‘worst of the best’ (what we generally refer to as being “average”) and have a fighting chance.
Because, although being average, insecure and/or comfy is a common tactic among many dojo rats that I know, those traits won’t exactly help you on the notorious ‘streets’.
You need something more.
I think that ‘something more’ is mental power.



  • We can change.

In fact, we are changing every day, all the time, without knowing. We experience change naturally as we age. The direction of that change, however, can either be determined by you or for you.
  • In sports, winners are the ones who successfully control and direct their self-image.
  • On the street, survivors are the ones who successfully control and direct their self-image
Notice some similarities? That’s why sports psychology is super important.
Example: Some people think it’s not “like them” to drive a car one hundred miles an hour. If they get just a few miles over the speed limit, their self-image makes them feel uncomfortable until they slow down. It’s not “like them” to drive fast, so they don’t. Another example: Some people think it’s not “like them” to be successful at certain stuff, like, say, cooking. So they just eat instant noodles all day long! If they happen to eat something more fancy, they feel uncomfortable.


 

 






3/09/2013

Is Yuri Boyka real

By BILAL BBA   Posted at  3/09/2013   No comments






yes he is real he had learnt mma for jut one movie in starting ,after that he became famous and started playing matches with real mma fighters







Scott Adkins

Scott Edward Adkins or boyka (born 17 June 1976) is an English actor and martial artist who is best known for playing Yuri Boyka in Undisputed II: Last Man Standing and Undisputed III: Redemption, Bradley Hume in Holby City, Ed Russell in Mile High and as Hector in The Expendables 2. Adkins has also appeared in Dangerfield, Hollyoaks, The Tournament TV series and many others, as well as many films


Life and career


Adkins was born in Birmingham, England. He first practiced martial arts when he visited a judo club with his father and brother at the age of 10. At age 14, he began training in Tae Kwon Do. Adkins also is an expert in kickboxing. A natural athlete, he is now a fully trained instructor for PKA. He also studied Wushu, Muay Thai and some different styles of Kung Fu. For the film Ninja he took Ninjutsu, Judo, Karate and Jiujitsu, which can be seen in the film. Adkins enrolled in a drama class at Sutton Coldfield College. At age 21, he was offered a place at the Webber Douglas Academy of Dramatic Art, however, due to lack of funding Adkins was unable to complete the course. His first professional came when he was offered a role in a Hong Kong martial arts film called Extreme Challenge and found himself in the East for the first time. Adkins had the opportunity to work with some of the leading film directors of Hong Kong action, including Yuen Wo Ping, Cory Yuen, Sammo Hung, and Jackie Chan. Active roles started coming and was offered a guest role in BBC's medical soap opera Doctors. Roles followed in BBC's EastEnders and City Central series, Sky One drama/comedy Mile High and a recurring role in BBC's Holby City as Bradley Hume. Adkins' first film role was in The Accidental Spy in 2001.He trained with Brace (The Eagle) Broca in MMA.



3/08/2013

Rules of Competition

By BILAL BBA   Posted at  3/08/2013   No comments


 Rules of Competition



The following links direct you to the pages that contain downloads/information for competition rules for various Karate governing bodies. Different tournaments follow slightly different rules for competition, so please contact Sensei Madani for any questions in regard of the rules of competition for the specific tournament you are attending.


   

History & Principles of Shotokan Karate

By BILAL BBA   Posted at  3/08/2013   No comments

A Short History of Shotokan Karate

Gichin Funakoshi is widely considered as the “father” of modern day karate. He was born in the Shuri prefecture in Okinawa in 1868 and at the age of 11 began to study Karate under two of Okinawa’s top masters. In time, he became a master in his own right and in 1922 he was invited to demonstrate karate to the Japanese public for the very first time. The demonstration was such a success he was invited to stay in Japan and teach, which he did with great success.

 For Sensei Funakoshi, the word ‘karate’ eventually took on a deeper meaning than just martial arts training, transforming into what is has become known as karate-do, the ‘way of the empty hand.’ He was to modify the Okinawan art by taking inspiration from traditional Japanese budo (kendo, judo, etc) and integrated their philosophical aspects into his and his student’s training. This became a total discipline, which represented a synthesis of Okinawaan and Japanese schools and in 1936 he established the ‘SHOTOKAN’ style of Japanese karate which was to be greatly influenced by his son Yoshitaka (Giko) and Masatoshi Nakayama, first headmaster of the Japan Karate Association.

Whereas his father was responsible for transforming karate from a mere fighting technique into a philosophical martial ‘do’ (way of life), Yoshitaka was put in charge of developing, helped by other important martial artists, a karate technique that definitively separated Japanese karate-do from the local Okinawaan art, thus giving it a completely different and at the same time notoriously Japanese flavour.
It is upon these concepts that in 1948, the Japan Karate Association (JKA) was founded. The establishment of the JKA lead the way to the spread of Shotokan karate throughout the world. Master Masatoshi Nakayama, one of Funakoshi’s greatest students, succeeded him as the headmaster of the JKA and during his time there he further developed Shotokan, based on his own research, into the style we know today.
It was through master Nakayama’s vision, that Shotokan has spread throughout the world by enriching many people’s lives in many countries, while other senior instructors stayed in Japan at the Sohonbu to teach the next generation of Shotokan masters.

Whereas his father was responsible for transforming karate from a mere fighting technique into a philosophical martial ‘do’ (way of life), Yoshitaka was put in charge of developing, helped by other important martial artists, a karate technique that definitively separated Japanese karate-do from the local Okinawaan art, thus giving it a completely different and at the same time notoriously Japanese flavour.
It is upon these concepts that in 1948, the Japan Karate Association (JKA) was founded. The establishment of the JKA lead the way to the spread of Shotokan karate throughout the world. Master Masatoshi Nakayama, one of Funakoshi’s greatest students, succeeded him as the headmaster of the JKA and during his time there he further developed Shotokan, based on his own research, into the style we know today.
It was through master Nakayama’s vision, that Shotokan has spread throughout the world by enriching many people’s lives in many countries, while other senior instructors stayed in Japan at the Sohonbu to teach the next generation of Shotokan masters.



Funakoshi’s (Shotokan) Principals

  • Never forget: Karate begins and ends with rei. Rei has the meaning of respect.
  • There is no “first hand” in Karate. (Meaning there is no first attack, karate is about self-defense)
  • Karate supports righteousness.
  • First understand yourself, then understand others.
  • The art of mind is more important than the art of technique.
  • The mind needs to be freed.
  • Trouble is born of negligence.
  • Do not think that Karate is only in the dojo.
  • The training of Karate requires a lifetime.
  • Transform everything into Karate; therein lies the exquisiteness.
  • Genuine Karate is like hot water; it cools down if you do not keep heating it.
  • Do not have an idea of winning, while the idea of losing is not necessary.
  • Transform yourself according to the opponent.
  • The outcome of the fight all depends on the maneuver.
  • Imagine one’s arms and legs as swords.
  • Once you leave the shelter of home there are a million enemies.
  • Postures are for the beginner, later they are natural positions.
  • Do the kata correctly, the real fight is a different matter.
  • Do not forget the dynamics of power, the elasticity of the body, and the speed of technique.
  • Always be good at the application of everything you have learned.

 


Back to top ↑
Connect with Us

    About Us

    Spice Mag - Premium free blogger template developed by spicytricks.com.

    Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Maecenas hendrerit iaculis nunc. Curabitur in eros ipsum. Pellentesque habitant morbi tristique senectus et netus et malesuada fames ac turpis egestas. Duis at mi justo, non suscipit elit. Nunc aliquam luctus adipiscing. Nullam sit amet lacus vitae odio congue mollis eu non magna. Duis sed arcu a libero adipiscing rhoncus. Aliquam erat volutpat. Suspendisse sed nunc metus, sed aliquet arcu.

    Recommend us on Google!

    Blogroll

What they says

© 2013 OPen mind OPen hart. WP Mythemeshop Converted by BloggerTheme9
Blogger templates. Proudly Powered by Blogger.